Posts Tagged ‘data security’

Four Tips to Protect your Data

Data breaches from cyber attacks are all over the news today. Although these types of security breaches are becoming more common, and more devastating, to the organizations and people involved, there is another kind of breach that is just as alarming.

Often times, informal transportation or improper storage of end-of-life electronics are the culprit. In untrained hands, sensitive information can be leaked, stolen or lost on the way to recycling centers or can be forgotten in dusty storage areas.

Consumers and businesses alike should be aware that electronic waste that is not disposed of properly poses a threat to sensitive data left on the devices. Finding a responsible electronics recycler will eliminate the risk of data breaches and grant the much-needed peace of mind that companies and individuals need.

Implementing a positive plan to combat electronic waste data breaches is the only realistic way to ensure that sensitive information remains safeguarded for end-of-life electronics.

Here are four tips to protect the valuable data contained on devices within your home, organization or business:

1. Get the best third party data destruction provider available

Laws and regulations ban dumping e-Waste into landfills and require specific methods for collection and disposal based on government guidelines.

When electronics devices reach end-of-life or are no longer wanted, relying on disposal plans managed by employees and staff for data destruction and e-Waste disposal is not effective, and leaves companies open to liability for breaches.

Instead, rely on a responsible R2/RIOS certified company with secure measures in place to handle the proper recycling of e-Waste and secure destruction of the information on hard drives and other data devices.

2. Avoid long-term storage of end-of-life devices

Long-term storage can increase the risk of loss or theft, which leads to serious data breaches. In fact, many data breach cases are the result of computers left to sit in off-site storage facilities with little or no regulation or supervision of the information contained on hard drives and storage devices.

Rather than choosing to place end-of-life devices in storage, creating an electronic waste disposal plan is the better choice. The plan should ensure that storage time is minimal or completely eliminated, thereby decreasing the risk of theft, loss or inadvertent exposure of sensitive information.

3. Know the laws on data destruction

Here in the U.S., most states with electronic recycling laws also require vendors to follow government regulations to ensure that consumer information remains safe. It is important to be aware of which guidelines apply to your organization and to organize an electronic waste disposal plan around them.

4) The best tip of all is too choose a responsible, certified electronics recycler who provides secure data destruction. This is the most effective way to ensure proper management and secure destruction of sensitive information contained on the hard drives of electronic drives.

Recycle with data security at the forefront

We live in a world where company and personal information is a highly valued commodity. It is crucial that companies do everything they can to stop their sensitive information from falling into the wrong and most devastating hands.

Recent mega-breaches by the numbers*:

Target: 40 million – The number of credit and debit cards thieves stole from Target between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15, 2013

eBay: 145 million people affected

JP Morgan Chase & Co.: 76 million households and 7 million small businesses affected

CHS Community Health Systems: 4.5 million people affected

Michael’s Stores: 2.6 million people affected

Neiman Marcus: 1.1 million people affected

The result?

Mega breaches are mega expensive! The average cost of a data breach for a company is $188 per record. Based on an average 28,765 records per US breach, one study identified a total organization cost of $5,403,644 per data breach.*

A call for change!

According to eWeek, “An alarming number of widely publicized data breaches is sparking change in the attitudes of business leaders and consumers when it comes to cyber-security. Consumers and regulators alike are demanding more communication and remedies from businesses after data breaches occur. As a result, the topic is one of the highest priorities facing businesses and regulators in 2015.”

Although the spotlight has been on infiltration by a criminal hacker, breaches can happen as a result of a company’s negligence in handling its end-of-life electronics; computers, hard drives, cell phones and all other data-bearing devices.

It is a paradox that while electronic waste is entering the waste stream at an accelerated pace, there’s little to no information on what happens to e-waste in the end – and the chaos that can ensue if not handled properly and responsibly.

By carefully reviewing an organization’s electronics and data disposal process, companies can nip the problem in the bud.

How can we do our part in helping to thwart data breaches?

Make it a top priority to outsource the management of unwanted electronics equipment to those who are qualified and experienced in handling recycling and data security management.

Be sure to use a R2/RIOS Certified, responsible recyling/data destruction company. These are highly regulated companies who achieve the highest level of excellence. Look for other certifications and compliances as well – HIPAA, DoD, NIST, NAID, NSA. For more information, check out WWW.PCSMASS.com

* According to the 2014 Ponemon Institute Report

** In May 2013, the Ponemon Institute released its 2013 Cost of Data Breach Study: Global Analysis (“Ponemon Study”),

E-Waste not want not

Are old computers, monitors and power supplies piling up around you? Now is the time to PROPERLY get rid of ALL the old electronics hanging around your place of work. PC Survivors of Massachusetts, LLC (PCS MASS) is your one-stop shop for the responsible disposal of everything electronic.

Why can’t you just throw it all out on the curb, toss in the dumpster or go to the dump? Quite simply, improper disposal of e-waste (electronics waste) is illegal and a danger to the environment. “But it’s just a cell phone/battery/hard drive/etc.” you may ask. “Maybe if I hide it in a trash bag and toss, nobody will notice?” You can be well assured our Earth will notice. As will the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) when they serve you up a severe fine.

Actually the materials inside of electrical devices can be a danger if not securely disposed. Imagine a land-fill chock full of e-waste where they will eventually release pollutants like nickel, lead, cadmium and mercury into our air, ground water and soil. Think of children brushing there teeth with this water – yuck – and extremely health hazardous. How about the fresh produce we eat and the grass-fed beef we consume? Think of the soil from which plants sprout. The long-term effects are scary.

Equally, if not more frightening, according to the EPA Americans disposed of 3,420,000 TONS of e-waste in 2012 (most recent year there is data).

E-waste is defined as any discarded electronic/electrical device (computers, cell phones, televisions, medical equipment, etc.), and is the fastest growing sector of waste in the United States.

Everybody needs to do their part and REUSE, RECOVER and RECYCLE! PCS MASS is one of the few RIOS/R2* certified recyclers in New England who are compliant with state and federal regulators such as NSA*, NIST*, DoD* and HIPPA*. What exactly do all these acronyms mean? Quite simply, they mean that PCS MASS upholds the highest standards for responsible electronics recycling. (If you like to translate acronyms – see below *)

What sets PCS MASS apart from other companies who also recycle e-waste, is that we are certified to ALSO PROVIDE SECURE on-site and off-site DATA DESTRUCTION; regulated by these same mandates.

There are several simple choices as to how to dispose of your e-waste. If you are in New England, first call PCS MASS 1-844-514-5093 or check out our website www.pcsmass.com. PCS MASS has large trucks that will come to your office, hospital, building, lab and safely pick up your e-waste. Or you can call first and schedule to drop it at our warehouse in Weymouth, MA. Every item will be documented and you will receive certification of secure disposal.

Here is a partial list of e-waste that is most-likely accumulating in your office now!

PCs/Laptops/Notebooks/Tablets
Servers/Server Racks/Network Equipment
Hard Drives/DLT Tape/Memory Chips/Circuit Cards
LCD Monitors
Cell Phones/Cameras/CD,DVD, VHS Players
Printers/Faxes/Copiers
Batteries/UPS
Keyboards/Mice/Cords/Cables
POS Equipment
Medical/Lab/Dental Equipment
Plus much more-(see www.pcsmass.com for a complete list)

If everyone puts forth a little extra effort and responsibly disposes of e-waste, we can use the almost 3.5 million tons of space currently taken up year over year, by this needless waste – for something good. How about organic farms? Parks? E-Waste in our landfills – NOT!

* Acronyms:
RIOS/R2: Responsible Industry Operating Standard/Recycle and Reuse
NSA: National Security Agency
NIST:National Institute of Standards and Technology
DoD: Department of Defense
HIPAA: Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

Destruction means business!

Reprint: Boston Globe
Jonathan Wiggs/Globe Staff

PCS co-owner Lisa Bacewicz with “The Green Monster.”
By Paul E. Kandarian, Globe Correspondent February 15, 2015

Got unwanted high-tech gear laying about, such as old computers, printers, cellphones, and hard drives, and not sure what to do with them? PCS of Massachusetts (PCS MASS), a Weymouth company started in 2005 by Lisa Bacewicz and her husband, Charles, shreds old equipment to recycle the material, and also specializes in data destruction. We talked with Lisa Bacewicz for this story.

Q. Why did you start doing this?

A. We were involved in the resale of old electronic equipment, which was a big industry before 2005. But the industry changed rapidly, and obsolete and surplus equipment doesn’t hold the value it used to. That’s why we went to the next stage of responsible recycling.

Q. What do you do?

A. We’re a certified responsible recycler of all electronic waste, including secure and compliant on-site hard drive and data destruction. We take in e-waste from companies. We bring a shredder on a 26-foot box truck, a big green box we call “The Green Monster.” We take custody of the data and provide a videotaped seven-step destruction process. Anything with encrypted data can be shredded, and we can reduce hard drives to pieces the size of your pinky finger. The metal can be refined into new products. We also have a drop-off at our office for people to drop off office-related waste for free, though there is a charge for computer terminals.

Q. Who are your customers?

A. We work all over New England with hospitals, health care facilities, attorneys, major corporations. Everyone in this day and age with an office will have electronics that eventually become obsolete: phone systems, printers, fax machines, power supplies, cords, batteries. Everything can be destroyed and recycled. Any company with regard for client information or personal information should be reaching out to a certified recycler. Most recently, we earned our R2/RIOS certification from Sustainable Electronics Recycling International.

Q. Why is data destruction important?

A. For years, people lacked understanding of what happens to data on hard drives, tapes, or other memory material. Breaches have brought awareness to the point they’re looking for viable, secure ways to destroy data so it doesn’t get into the wrong hands.

Q. Business is good?

A. Extremely. We’re hiring more people, and by the middle of the year will move to a larger facility on the South Shore.

Paul E. Kandarian can be reached at pkandarian@ aol.com.

NEWS

AT&T Fined $52 Million for Dumping E-Scrap

Telecommunications giant AT&T has reached a $52 million settlement with the state of California for illegally dumping scrap electronics in state landfills.
The settlement was announced on Nov. 20 by California’s attorney general and was described by state officials as their first e-scrap management enforcement action against a telecom company.

“This settlement holds AT&T accountable for unlawfully dumping electronic waste. The illegal disposal of hazardous waste can lead to serious environmental and health risks for California communities. AT&T will be required to implement strict compliance measures at its facilities that set an example for other companies to safeguard our communities against hazardous waste.” The settlement calls for the company to pay $23.8 million in fines.

Please call PCS MASS to discuss Responsible Electronics/Components Recycling and Secure On-Site Hard Drive Data Destruction Solutions!

PCS MASS is R2:2013 Certified!

R2/RIOS™ certification is solely for electronics recyclers to demonstrate to customers that electronics equipment is being recycled with the highest standards for environmental protection, worker health and safety, and data privacy, and facility security. A facility that has invested R2/RIOS™ certification has upgraded to the highest, most responsible standards in recycling.

Green thought for the day: Spring is a great time to start your businesses Spring cleaning and get organized for Summer. This means clearing out all those old PC’s that have accumulated over the past few months. Please call PCS of MA today to discuss “Green” Recycling Solutions and Secure On-Site Hard Drive Data Destruction services!

News: California DMV hit with possible data breach

March has been tough as far as stolen data goes.  Most recently, the California DMV announced customer infomration may have been  compromised after MasterCard sent several banks a notice saying that credit card numbers, expiration dates, and three-digit verification codes were compromised.

That full initial story can be found here at Krebs on Security.  Here’s an excerpt.

If indeed the California DMV has suffered a breach of their online payments system, it’s unclear how many card numbers may have been stolen. But the experience of one institution that received the MasterCard alert this week may offer some perspective.

The alert was tailored for individual banks, including a list of the credit and debit card numbers that each bank had potentially exposed. One California bank that received the alert said the notice included a list of more than 1,000 cards that the bank had issued to customers. To put that in perspective, this same bank had just over 3,000 cards impacted by the breach at Target late last year, and that was a break-in that ultimately jeopardized more than 40 million card numbers at banks nationwide.

A few weeks ago A data breach in the North Dakota University System was announced. School officials said the intrusion could impact hundreds of thousands of people. Check out the official statement from the school here. 

On February 7, the NDUS discovered suspicious activity on a server. Unfortunately, the impacted server housed personal information, such as names and Social Security numbers, for more than 290,000 current and former students and about 780 faculty and staff. The server was immediately locked down. The internal investigation, as well as an external forensic team, found no evidence that any personal information was accessed, copied, transmitted or printed. However, NDUS is offering identity protection services to those whose information was housed on the server as an extra precaution.

The university system says it will begin notifying those who could have been impacted and provide information on its website about free credit monitoring to those who were affected.

An interesting side note, Brian Krebs, who broke the Target story and who wrote about the California DMV breach will be the subject of a new movies.  Via the Star Tribune. 

Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. confirmed Friday that it is working on a movie based on the security blogger who exposed TargetCorp.’s monster data security breach.

No production date has been set, a Sony spokeswoman said, but the cyberthriller will be penned by Richard Wenk, a writer and director whose credits include “The Expendables 2” and “The Mechanic.” He also wrote “The Equalizer,” a not-yet-released movie that has Denzel Washington playing a former black ops commando.

Also, a bit about Krebs from the Tribune article. Unreal.

The blogger, Brian Krebs, is an independent investigative reporter who digs into the dark Web world of hackers, malware, stolen data and cybercriminals, many from Eastern Europe. The former Washington Post reporter says he keeps a 12-gauge shotgun handy because he has been threatened so often. He was once shipped a parcel containing fecal matter.

Back to the matter at hand. Data safety. If you need your data securely destroyed you know who you can count on. Please check out our comprehensive website to select the one or all of the many data destruction and electronic recycling services we supply.

If you’re looking for a reliable asset disposal service, PCS of Massachusetts is ready and willing to help you recycle your electronics and destroy your data.  PC Survivors of Massachusetts, L.L.C.  (R2) Certified,  86 Finnell Drive Unit 6,Weymouth, MA 02188 /Cell: 781-635-6281 /Office: 781-335-1220 / Fax: 781-335-1499 / www.pcsmass.com

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03 2014

How to Find a Responsible Electronic Recycler

With technology often evolving faster than perceived market demand, electronics have officially become the largest growing recyclable material in the U.S., with over 7 million tons of electronics equipment available for recycling each year.

Electronics recyclers must take special care to ensure that any hazardous substances or residues removed during the recycling process (such as batteries, leaded-glass, and mercury) are recovered safely and recycled. Over at Earth911, they’ve got a run down of how to recycle everything from clothes to iPods. Recently, they posted an interesting look at the Electronic Recycling industry.

Electronics Recycling Faces Regulation

As recycling is a business endeavor, these companies must do all this while trying to maximize the profit on what is collected. Herein lies the challenge – the responsible de-manufacturing of electronics costs money.

According to a report from the International Data Corporation, in 2011 the ever-growing electronics recycling industry responsibly processed between three and four million tons of used electronics equipment. However, there is an estimated 7 million tons of electronics equipment (predominately from households) available for recycling, meaning about 3 million tons are still being sent to landfills. To ensure responsible practices are used for disposal as well as  privacy, safety and environmental practice, some states have passed laws to ensure the responsible recycling of used electronics.

Half of all U.S. states now fall under some type of e-cycling or landfill ban. From manufacturer-financed end of life management to mandatory consumer take-back programs, 25 states now have laws on electronics recycling in one form or another: the common driver within each law being the increased recovery and safe recycling of used electronics.

 The Importance of Electronics Certification

A trend on the rise across the industry is the requirement for electronic recyclers to be certified by an accredited third party, which helps them conform the recycling process to a set standard of privacy and environmental compliance.

One such certification on the rise is the R2/ RIOS standard, a dual standard combing the R2 certification with the Recycling Industry Operating Standard (RIOS).

PCS of MA has a RIOS Certification pending in the fall of 2014!

The Right Way to Recycle Electronics

As a consumer, there are some important things to know or ask when preparing to recycle your used electronics.

First, are electronics covered in your city collection program? Many municipalities offer electronic recycling pickup or drop-off services as part of residential solid waste programs. If your city does not offer e-cycling, many retailers and independent recyclers can be found with a simple internet search.

Another question to look into is how to prepare your electronics for e-cycling. Many electronic recyclers will guarantee data destruction as part of their services, but others will not, meaning you would want to wipe your hard drive data before turning it over to the facility.

Or you can have PCS of Mass take care of it all for you! Learn more here.

If you’re looking for a reliable asset disposal service, PCS of Massachusetts is ready and willing to help you recycle your electronics and destroy your data.  PC Survivors of Massachusetts, L.L.C.  (R2) Certified,  86 Finnell Drive Unit 6,Weymouth, MA 02188 /Cell: 781-635-6281 /Office: 781-335-1220 / Fax: 781-335-1499 / www.pcsmass.com

 

News: 4-year long HIPAA breach uncovered in Virginia

It was reported early this year that a former employee at a 5-hospital healthcare system in Virginia accessed confidential patient records over a four year period. The massive breach of security and rivacy could end up costing the company, Riverside Health System, millions.

From September 2009 through October 2013, a former Riverside employee inappropriately accessed the Social Security numbers and electronic medical records of 919 patients. Reportedly, the employee was a licensed practical nurse, according to a Daily Press account. The breach wasn’t discovered until Nov. 1 following a random company audit.

According to a Heathcare IT article, the settlement could be incredibly expensive topping almost $50 million.

HIPAA covered entities and, more recently, business associates can be slapped with up to $50,000 fines per HIPAA violation due to willful neglect that goes uncorrected. Entities could face $10,000 per violation due to willful neglect when the violation is properly addressed.

There’s an easy solution for a problem like this: Hire PCS to come and destroy your vulnerable data on-site. At PC Survivors of Mass., we offer a seven stage solution for data destruction when we bring the equipment to you.

  1. Arrive at your Facility with our AMS-750HD Mobile Hard Drive/Data Shredder with ¾” Shred Cut/Enhanced Throughput and our Optical Media Destruction Device (OMDD) HSM 411.2 Cross Cut Shredder for CDs and DVDs.Off-site: Take Custody of your Data in Locked Containers and transport Data back to our Secure Warehouse for Destruction.
  2. Scan each individual Hard Drive Serial Number prior to destruction/All other Data items will be counted by type.
  3. Destroy each individual Hard Drive/Data by means of Mechanical Shredding.
  4. Provide the client with a USB Data Storage Device containing the individual serial numbers of each Shredded Hard Drive and final counts of all Data destroyed.
  5. Provide the client with a Video Tape Media Card of their entire Destruction Service.
  6. Provide the client with a Certificate of Data Destruction with hard copy listing of individual Hard Drive serial numbers and final counts of all Data destroyed.
  7. Provide the client with a Certificate of Recycling for the Hard Drive/Data shredded material.

If you’d like to learn more about our data destruction services, head over our PCS Mass. website here.

If you’re looking for a reliable asset disposal service, PCS of Massachusetts is ready and willing to help you recycle your electronics and destroy your data.  PC Survivors of Massachusetts, L.L.C.  (R2) Certified,  86 Finnell Drive Unit 6,Weymouth, MA 02188 /Cell: 781-635-6281 /Office: 781-335-1220 / Fax: 781-335-1499 / www.pcsmass.com

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03 2014

News: Target, Neiman Marcus Face Data Breaches

The news keeps getting worse for Target while the scope of holiday data breaches expands. Last week it was revealed that the Target data breach has expanded from 40 million to 70 million accounts that were compromised. Retailer giant Nieman Marcus also confirmed that they had also been the victims of hackers.

There’s a great story about that and the possibility of more retailers may have been hacked over at the Christian Science Monitor. Reuters reported Sunday that at least three other well-known US retailers faced data breaches during the holidays, citing information from unnamed sources.

“The sources said that they involved retailers with outlets in malls, but declined to elaborate. They also said that while they suspect the perpetrators may be the same as those who launched the Target attack, they cannot be sure because they are still trying to find the culprits behind all of the security breaches,” the Reuters report reads. “Law enforcement sources have said they suspect the ring leaders are from Eastern Europe, which is where most big cybercrime cases have been hatched over the past decade.”

The report didn’t say whether the Neiman Marcus breach was related to the others.

The Target cyber break-in affected customers who shopped in-store and online between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15, in the thick of the holiday season. Though Target initially said about 40 million shoppers were affected, the retailer revealed last week that the hackers stole between 70 million and 110 million shoppers’ credit card numbers, PIN numbers, e-mail and mailing addresses, and phone numbers. Target also came under fire for waiting four days to disclose the breach publicly.

As a result of the hacks Target stands to take a big hit: as much as $50 million, according to CNN Money. The retailer also announced last week it would offer free credit monitoring and identity-theft protection for worried customers.

The biggest risk, experts say, is that potential scammers could have customers’ contact information and the knowledge that they shop at Target. But that on its own isn’t enough for identity theft. “It’s bad they got a customer list, but the worst case scenario is a very targeted email phishing campaign,” said Adrian Sanabria, a security analyst, told CNN Money. “I don’t see any risk of identity theft from having that exposed.”

If you’re looking for a reliable asset disposal service, PCS of Massachusetts is ready and willing to help you recycle your electronics and destroy your data.  PC Survivors of Massachusetts, L.L.C.  (R2) Certified,  86 Finnell Drive Unit 6,Weymouth, MA 02188 /Cell: 781-635-6281 /Office: 781-335-1220 / Fax: 781-335-1499 / www.pcsmass.com

 

14

01 2014

News: Million-Year Data Storage Disk Unveiled

Recently, MIT Technology Review reported that eroen de Vries at the University of Twente in the Netherlands and a few pals have designed and built a disk capable of storing data over an enormous timescale. According to their tests, the new technology should be able to store data for 1 million years and possibly longer.

From the MIT article: “despite this huge increase in storage density and a similarly impressive improvement in power efficiency, one thing hasn’t changed. The lifetime over which data can be stored on magnetic discs is still about a decade.”

Here’s some technical jargon from the post, describing how the team created the new disk.

The disk is simple in conception. The data is stored in the pattern of lines etched into a thin metal disc and then covered with a protective layer.

The metal in question is tungsten, which they chose because of its high melting temperature (3,422 degrees C) and low thermal expansion coefficient. The protective layer is silicon nitride (Si3N4) chosen because of its high resistance to fracture and its low thermal expansion coefficient.

These guys made their disc using standard patterning techniques and stored data in the form of QR codes with lines 100nm wide. They then heated the disks at various temperatures to see how the data fared.

The results are impressive. According to Arrhenius law, a disk capable of surviving a million years would have to survive 1 hour at 445 Kelvin, a test that the new disks passed with ease. Indeed, they survived temperatures up to 848 Kelvin, albeit with significant amounts of information loss.

You can check out the entire article via the link at the top of the page.

If you’re looking for a reliable asset disposal service, PCS of Massachusetts is ready and willing to help you recycle your electronics and destroy your data.  PC Survivors of Massachusetts, L.L.C.  (R2) Certified,  86 Finnell Drive Unit 6,Weymouth, MA 02188 /Cell: 781-635-6281 /Office: 781-335-1220 / Fax: 781-335-1499 / www.pcsmass.com

14

01 2014

News: Target Woes Continue After Data Security Breach

It keeps getting worse for retailer chain Target. After the loss of account information for over 40 million people, it has know been revealed that thieves managed to gain secret PIN code numbers in addition to the previous security breach. In an article on the Huffington Post, it was revealed that Target’s reputation among consumers has taken a huge hit.

The company’s “Buzz score,” a measurement of brand popularity developed by polling site YouGov, dropped by 35 points to -9 on Dec. 20, the day after Target announced that hackers may have gotten access to 40 million customers’ credit and debit card information. On Monday it fell even further to -19. Scores range from 100 to -100.

Currently, the Justice Department is investigating the data breach. Customers affected by the Target breach complained that they had to cancel credit and debit cards just as they were rushing to buy holiday gifts. Millions of others faced bank-imposed limits on how much cash they could take out at ATMs or spend on their debit cards.

In the wake of the recent revelation that the Target data breach was worse than first reported, many customers have started to take legal action against the retailer. According to a report by CNN Money, Target is facing lawsuits from almost two dozen consumers.

Customers in from California, Oregon and Washington to Louisiana, Massachusetts and Rhode Island have filed would-be class actions in federal courts, alleging Target was negligent and did not protect their card information.

Plaintiffs in several states alleged Target “failed to implement and maintain reasonable security procedures and practices.”

Robert Ahdoot, a lawyer for the California plaintiffs, said he spoke to customers who claimed unauthorized ATM withdrawals had been made from their accounts.

“Target has an obligation to provide adequate security for the financial information they collect,” Ahdoot said.

Some suits also alleged negligence, and claimed customers would not have purchased from Target if they knew of the breach, which lasted from Black Friday through mid-December but was not disclosed until last week.

Snyder, the Target spokeswoman, said the company doesn’t “comment on pending litigation.”

In related news, the New York Times reported last week Brian Krebs, the security blogger who first broke the news that Target had been breached, said he believed he had identified a Ukranian man who he said was behind one of the primary black market sites now selling Target customers’ credit and debit card information for as much as $100 a piece.

If customers do return to Target after this massive security lapse, I can assume many will be using cash.

If you’re looking for a reliable asset disposal service, PCS of Massachusetts is ready and willing to help you recycle your electronics and destroy your data.  PC Survivors of Massachusetts, L.L.C.  (R2) Certified,  86 Finnell Drive Unit 6,Weymouth, MA 02188 /Cell: 781-635-6281 /Office: 781-335-1220 / Fax: 781-335-1499 / www.pcsmass.com

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12 2013