Recycle with data security at the forefront

We live in a world where company and personal information is a highly valued commodity. It is crucial that companies do everything they can to stop their sensitive information from falling into the wrong and most devastating hands.

Recent mega-breaches by the numbers*:

Target: 40 million – The number of credit and debit cards thieves stole from Target between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15, 2013

eBay: 145 million people affected

JP Morgan Chase & Co.: 76 million households and 7 million small businesses affected

CHS Community Health Systems: 4.5 million people affected

Michael’s Stores: 2.6 million people affected

Neiman Marcus: 1.1 million people affected

The result?

Mega breaches are mega expensive! The average cost of a data breach for a company is $188 per record. Based on an average 28,765 records per US breach, one study identified a total organization cost of $5,403,644 per data breach.*

A call for change!

According to eWeek, “An alarming number of widely publicized data breaches is sparking change in the attitudes of business leaders and consumers when it comes to cyber-security. Consumers and regulators alike are demanding more communication and remedies from businesses after data breaches occur. As a result, the topic is one of the highest priorities facing businesses and regulators in 2015.”

Although the spotlight has been on infiltration by a criminal hacker, breaches can happen as a result of a company’s negligence in handling its end-of-life electronics; computers, hard drives, cell phones and all other data-bearing devices.

It is a paradox that while electronic waste is entering the waste stream at an accelerated pace, there’s little to no information on what happens to e-waste in the end – and the chaos that can ensue if not handled properly and responsibly.

By carefully reviewing an organization’s electronics and data disposal process, companies can nip the problem in the bud.

How can we do our part in helping to thwart data breaches?

Make it a top priority to outsource the management of unwanted electronics equipment to those who are qualified and experienced in handling recycling and data security management.

Be sure to use a R2/RIOS Certified, responsible recyling/data destruction company. These are highly regulated companies who achieve the highest level of excellence. Look for other certifications and compliances as well – HIPAA, DoD, NIST, NAID, NSA. For more information, check out WWW.PCSMASS.com

* According to the 2014 Ponemon Institute Report

** In May 2013, the Ponemon Institute released its 2013 Cost of Data Breach Study: Global Analysis (“Ponemon Study”),

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